Month: February, 2016

12 Feb

Instagram now (finally!) allows multiple account management

Instagram, social media, social media strategy, strategy

 

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By Michaela Lawson

The moment all social media managers have been waiting for is finally here: Instagram supports account switching. The headache of logging out and in on various accounts is now a headache of the past.

With the rise of profiles dedicated to businesses, pets, professional accounts and any number of other things, the ease of navigating between profiles was an inevitable step for Instagram to make.

But wait, there’s more: you can add up to five accounts with one login. This is an obvious advantage whether you’re a small business managing your personal and business account, a brand manager managing multiple brand accounts or an agency partner managing multiple client accounts.

For marketers, this feature could not have come at a more perfect time (well, except for the fact that we’ve all been waiting for it). Last September, Instagram announced that its self-serve ad offering would be made available to all business, everywhere. And given the platform’s growth – which has doubled from 200 million users in 2014 to 400 million this year so far – advertisers have used the platform to reach its growing, visually-focused user base.

The ability to quickly and easily switch between accounts will also enable social media managers to avoid other problems they faced with the old approach to Instagram account management.

The new functionality allows for the increase in content posted. The easy navigation between profiles will allow individuals to update business profiles without having to logout and log back in. Being able to switch and post could make business owners more active on the platform, and the amount of time saved will be significant for those with active brand profiles alongside their own, personal accounts.

Being actively switching between multiple accounts also allows for more immediate customer service. The app now notifies based on profile what activity is being made on respective accounts. This capability allows for individuals to know who, when and where others are interacting with their content. For brand managers, this ability allows for better responsiveness to their audiences when comments or questions are made on brand posts.

* Note: The update is also important for those who currently use third-party tools to perform similar account switching as Instagram announced recently that they’ll be restricting access to their API (Application Program Interface) as of June 1, 2016.

08 Feb

It’s true: Twitter is going algorithmic

Social, social media, social media strategy, the internet is great, Twitter

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By Michaela Lawson

BuzzFeed News has blown the whistle on Twitter’s optional timeline algorithm, which will push popular tweets – out of chronological order – to the top of timelines. Hang on, though… I think you missed an important word in that first sentence: optional. That’s right, the feature is completely optional.

The feature has been likened to an extended “While You Were Away” feature by The Verge, saying that the “disorienting” arrangement of tweets is not much different from the pop-up section that shows you the popular things you missed when your Twitter app was closed.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey responded the the backlash of the weekend saying that Twitter is not dying and moving away from their roots, they’re simply adding new features for users to enjoy.

So, if everyone is so upset with the disruption of their timeline with the new algorithm feature and opt out, what was the point in the time spent in developing the change at all?

In another effort to compete with social media giant, Facebook, the Twitter has rolled out various features within the past year – with more down the pipeline for the future – that steer away from its original appeal. With favorites becoming likes, prioritizing algorithms and a move away from limited characters, Twitter progresses toward a bite-sized version of Facebook.

For new users, the prioritizing feature may be able to get them accustomed to the reverse-timeline aspect of Twitter until they get proper footing. Once comfortable, users can opt out and enjoy the stream of live tweets without any disruption.
Bottom-line: Twitter is not changing, they’re just diversifying users’ ability to prioritize or filter through their timelines.

And now a word from Smirk New Media president Mike Koehler: “Has there been a worse possible idea in the history of social media? Yes, I’m sure there has been, but none spring to mind. Twitter is made to be not-Facebook and adding a timeline which abandons the streaminess of Twitter betrays what we use the platform for – discovering what our community is talking about in real-time. You might be able to opt-out of this disaster of an idea, but what it’s going to do is deteriorate the idea that I can share moments with the people in our digital neighborhood and that’s going to be a loss not just for Twitter but for everyone accustomed to using it that way.”