Month: November, 2015

25 Nov

Smirksgiving: our team is thankful for social media

Michaela Lawson Business, Content, Mike Koehler, social media, the internet is great Tags: , , , ,

The “most wonderful time of the year” starts with the recognition and thanksgiving for all the little things. This Thanksgiving, we’re thankful for the benefits digital marketing gives businesses and folks like us who manage social media for our clients’ great brands. Here are some of the things we’re thankful for:

1. Shared experiences

“I am thankful for shared Twitter experiences. Whether it’s the latest rumbling of an Oklahoma earthquake, the last seconds ticking down on a Thunder game or whomever is stumbling up the steps at the Oscars, being able to joke, snark, question and cheer on Twitter is now and always has been a blessing. I strongly believe that Twitter has strengthened our community’s muscles over the past few years and 2015 was no different. We keep growing up as an online community – we support folks who lose their jobs, help new events find their footing and keep talking in 140 characters or less. Just this year we did it with more photos, more GIFs and more moments.”

– Mike Koehler, president and chief strategist

2. Community

I’m thankful for community. That’s what social media is to me. Groups of people passionate about similar causes, ideas and industries who connect, interact, share, support and spur each other on. It’s opened my eyes to people and perspectives I otherwise wouldn’t have known or considered, helping to build empathy. Community is a powerful thing, and I’m thankful for the community that social media provides.”

– Kevin DeShazo, senior strategist

3. Higher marketing standards

“I am thankful that social media has not just changed the marketing game, but raised the bar. The traditional sales pitch is dead and I’m not sad to see it go. Unlike media outlets of the past, platforms, like Facebook, design their advertising standards putting the customer experience first to cultivate a captive audience. They limit overly promotional content and reward brands for creativity, originality and relevance to their target audience. Some see this change as an inconvenience, but I see it as a big opportunity. Those willing to adapt stand out amongst their competitors and are experiencing the benefits. Brands using social media well are creating more personal, conversational customer relationships than ever before, resulting in a positive impact on in their customer service, sales and community.”

– Allie Carrick, senior strategist

4. Local connections and information

“I am grateful that we live in a time where we can witness connections being fostered and help being given over social media platforms. It has been heartwarming to see local restaurants/suppliers reach out to nonprofits to supply food for Thanksgiving dinners across the state – like Other Options.

I am also thankful that businesses of all kinds are increasingly active on social media, as it allows us to find their Thanksgiving plans with ease; restaurants are tweeting their specials, their holiday hours, and generally connecting with their followers. Take Pie Junkie for example!”

– Lennon Patton, sales strategist

5. Creative sharing

“I’m thankful for the wealth of free or low cost creative sources available to the public. Artists of all forms contribute free resources of photos, graphics and fonts to make good content stand out. Programs like Canva give users with limited graphic design experience the ability to create professional graphics in preset dimensions for all of the digital platforms – social media, email, blogs, etc. Other low cost and free resources provide easy access to photography, mockups or graphics. More than the visual representations, however, the free resource of ideas, information and studies make content creation easier. By observing the digital world around us, these resources give us the ability to expand on ideas and create new trends.” 

– Michaela Lawson, intern

Social media and the digital age have given us much more to be thankful for than just these perks, and the upcoming year will bring even more to be thankful for.

09 Nov

Promoted Moments alters storytelling on Twitter for brands

Michaela Lawson social media, Twitter Tags: , , ,

Moments are to Twitter as Discover is to Snapchat. But where Snapchat fails to embrace the user, Twitter integrates brand and buddy in one seamless stream of popular activity.

Advertisers and social media strategists have all but mastered the art of redesigning and cropping their advertisements into  tailored Discover stories for Snapchat, but they miss the key role of providing value instead of cluttering the conversation.

Enter Twitter Moments.

Twitter is a flowing stream of information that demands its users to fight the current to pick up everything from the latest news to the latest trend. For those who are not active Twitter stream swimmers, the social network and its reverse timeline of 140-character information can be daunting. The Moments feature uses human curators to highlight the newest and hottest trends & delivers them in a neat package.

Twitter didn’t take long finding ways to monetize its new offering. Two weeks after the launch of Moments, Promoted Moments were announced to start trial runs within the Moments stream. Promoted Moments will show brand narratives that include everything from real-time events to seasonally relevant ones and those defined as “authentic narratives around a brand’s values” in multimedia format.

These sponsored Moments allow brands complete control to present a series of different tweets – and even Vines – to tell their story. Each Promoted Moment will last up to 24 hours with the ability to be constantly updated.

As brands start creating content for Promoted Moments, it’s important to remember what contributing to conversation means for users.

  1. Brand-generated content gives a behind-the-scenes vantage point to audiences.

People are increasingly more interested in the exclusive, behind-the-scenes access to the brands and people they love. With this information ready at brands’ fingertips constantly, Promoted Moments gives a new outlet for brands to give the people what they want; and, more importantly, what they are eager to engage with.

  1. Conversation contribution is not the same as conversation curation.

As brands highlight Moments to share with the public, it is important to remember that promotional content for the brand might not be the most interesting piece of information to audiences. Starting a conversation and contributing to it is much different than pushing conversation to viewers. People will interact more purposefully with topics they feel their input is valued in.

  1. Moments give audiences short-bursts of information for a short amount of time.

With a short shelf-life, Promoted Moments gives users the unique opportunity to be part of a conversation in one moment with a brand. This is perfect for live-events and short-term specials, offers or deals. Although not all audiences will tune in to the conversation during its Moment to shine, the overall potential of reach in a short-blast of curated information garners great potential for brands to share their story in the best package they can.

  1. Multiple Tweets together defy the limited character rule.

With the potential of streaming multiple 140-character tweets together in one Moment, brands have a unique storytelling opportunity in Twitter to build a story within a string of Tweets. The limited messaging of 140-characters at least loosens its grip. The ability to tell a story throughout multiple pieces allows brands to spread information across multiple photos, videos or messages.

As Promoted Moments continue to grow, brands have the ability to provide unique conversation to their audiences and be an important facilitator in conversation any given Moment of the day.

Photo from Twitter, Inc.

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